Dating and marriage customs in south korea

20-Dec-2014 09:07 by 9 Comments

Dating and marriage customs in south korea

Approaching people on the streets is not as common as in the West, for example, but young adults are generally more open to strangers than their parents’ generation, especially if they have had a drink or two.

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Couples pretty much live in a fascinating parallel world of coupleness, and everyone wants to experience what it’s like to be in it.Most restaurants and cafés have menus designed specifically for couples, major attractions have romantic date packages for two, and movie theaters even offer private couches for an intimate date.For those that are not used to such couple-centric culture, this might all sound puke-inducingly sweet, but once you try everything out yourself, you realize that the couple activities are actually fun and meaningful.It can be pretty awkward to decide who’s going to get the bill, especially if it’s your first date.Every culture has its unique dating customs, and Korea is definitely no exception.In Korea, dating is all about showing your affection for each other – couple menus, shirts, and sneakers are everywhere, and every month has at least one special, albeit incredibly commercial, day for couples to celebrate.

There’s just so much to do and experience if you’re a couple, or at least going on dates, and that’s why everyone is always looking for someone!

Naturally, each and every relationship is special and unique, and there’s no guidebook to mastering the “Korean dating style.” But, if you ever find yourself getting ready for a date in Korea, nervous and clueless about what to expect, our list should give you an idea of how dating here works.

When in need of a date, look no further than your Korean friends.

It is all about connections, and people commonly set their single friends up with each other.

You’re technically going on a blind date, but at least you know (s)he’s not a creep (always a plus) and you should have something in common.

In Korea, people rarely meet anyone outside their personal school or work circle unless they’re introduced by a mutual friend.