Dating antique crucifixes

02-Jun-2015 03:18 by 7 Comments

Dating antique crucifixes - sex dating in rosburg washington

The swastika is a sacred sign in India, and is very ancient and widespread throughout the East. of Great Britain, VI, 454) believes it more common among the latter than among the former. In the last monument the swastika is imperfect in form, and resembles a Phnician letter.

The Buddhist inscriptions carved in certain caves of Western India are usually preceded or closed by this sacred sign (Thomas Edward, "The Indian Swastika", 1880; Philip Greg, "On the Meaning and Origin of the Fylfot and Swastika"). Another symbol which has been connected with the cross is the ansated cross () of the ancient Egyptians, wrongly called the "ansated key of the Nile".

The celebrated excavations of Schliemann at Hissarlik on the site of ancient Troy brought to light numerous examples of the swastika: on spindle-racks, on a cube, sometimes attached to an animal, and even cut upon the womb of a female idol, a detail also noticeable on a small statue of the goddess Athis. For its presence on Galatian and Bithynian monuments, see Guillaume and Perrot, "Exploration archéologique de la Galatie et de la Bithynie", Atlas, Pl. We find it also on the coins of Lycia and of Gaza in Palestine. II, 178-179) This sign is also found in Pompeian mosaics, on Italo-Grecian vases, on coins of Syracuse in Sicily (Raoul-Rochette, "Mém. It often appears as a symbolic sign in the hands of the goddess Sekhet.

The swastika sign is seen on Hittite monuments, e.g. In the Island of Cyprus it is found on earthenware vessels. 2, II, 178-179), and in the treasury of Orchomenus. From the earliest times also it appears among the hieroglyphic signs symbolic of life or of the living, and was transliterated into Greek as ).

on a cylinder ("The monuments of the Hittites" in "Transactions of the Soc. It originally represents, as again at Athens and Mycenæ, a flying bird. II, 302 sqq.; "Hercule assyrien", 377-380; Minervini in "Bull. It seems to have been unknown in Assyria, in Phnicia, and in Egypt. There are many such emblems on the urns found at Capanna di Corneto, Bolsena, and Vetulonia; also in a Samnite tomb at Capua, where it appears in the centre of the tunic of the person there depicted (Minervini, Bull. But the meaning of this sign is very obscure (Da Morgan, Recherches sur les origines de l'Egypte, 1896-98); perhaps it was originally, like the swastika, an astronomical sign.

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The sign of the cross, represented in its simplest form by a crossing of two lines at right angles, greatly antedates, in both the East and the West, the introduction of Christianity.

It goes back to a very remote period of human civilization.

In fact, some have sought to attach to the widespread use of this sign, a real ethnographic importance. 178-179); finally among the ancient Germans, on a rock-carving in Sweden, on a few Celtic stones in Scotland, and on a Celtic stone discovered in the County of Norfolk, England, and now in the British Museum.

It is true that in the sign of the cross the decorative and geometrical concept, obtained by a juxtaposition of lines pleasing to the sight, is remarkably prominent; nevertheless, the cross was originally not a mere means or object of ornament, and from the earliest times had certainly another — i.e. The primitive form of the cross seems to have been that of the so-called "gamma" cross (. The swastika, appears in an epitaph on a pagan tombstone of Tebessa in Roman Africa (Annuaire de la Société de Constantine, 1858-59, 205, 87), on a mosaic of the (Ennio Quirino Visconti, Opere varie, ed.

At successive periods this was modified, becoming curved at the extremities, or adding to them more complex lines or ornamental points, which latter also meet at the central intersection. Milan, I, 141, sqq.), and in a Greek votive inscription at Porto.