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(Crawford Art Gallery) Cork experienced its first recorded encounter with the Vikings in 820, when its great monastery was attacked.

Yet the annals record only three further raids on Cork by Vikings from overseas in the following three and a half centuries.

The first record we have of a Viking settlement at Cork dates from 846, when Irish annals report that Ólchobhar mac Cináeda, king of Munster, attacked a Viking stronghold at Cork (dún Corcaighe). Vikings based at Cork were active in 865, when their leader, Gnimbeolu, was killed in an encounter with the men of Decies (Waterford).

The Three fragments state that the Irish then destroyed the Vikings’ castle (caisteol).

The annals make no further reference to the Vikings at Cork until the twelfth century.

It is important to note that those early Viking fortifications were simply raiding bases.