Teen dating violence program

06-Jul-2016 15:27 by 6 Comments

Teen dating violence program

The Dating Violence Intervention Program (DVIP) works with young people, in school, and in youth-serving organizations.

Like intimate partner violence among adults, TDV occurs without respect to age, race, religion, socioeconomic status and sexual orientation.

Approximately 25 percent of teens report experiencing TDV annually (Noonan & Charles, 2009).

It can include emotional, verbal, physical and/or sexual abuse.

In most cases of TDV, violence is used to get another to do what he/she wants, to gain power and control, to cause humiliation and to promote fear, and to retaliate against a partner (Foshee & Langwick, 2010).

An article published by the National Institute of Justice discusses current research on TDV and concludes that there are three key differences between adult and teen dating relationships: Because the dynamics of intimate partner abuse are different in adolescent and adult relationships, it is important not to apply an adult framework of intimate partner violence to teen dating violence.

The ultimate goal of prevention and intervention is to stop dating violence before it begins.

During the preteen and teen years, young people are learning the skills they need to form positive, healthy relationships with others.This is an ideal time to promote healthy relationships and prevent patterns of relationship violence that can last into adulthood.[1]Studies investigating the effectiveness of programs to prevent dating violence are beginning to show positive results.Most programs focus on changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors linked with dating violence while focusing on the skills needed to build healthy relationships.In one rigorous NIJ-funded study, school-level interventions in 30 New York City public middle schools reduced dating violence by up to 50 percent.[2]Researchers evaluated dating violence and sexual harassment interventions by randomly assigning classes to receive: Youth exposed to domestic violence are at greater risk for being both a victim and the perpetrator of dating violence.Classroom-level interventions were delivered in six sessions, using a curriculum emphasizing the consequences for perpetrators, state laws and penalties, the construction of gender roles, and healthy relationships.School-level interventions included the use of temporary school-based restraining orders, higher levels of faculty and security presence in "hot spots," and raising awareness schoolwide.